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GDPR FAQ for App developers

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 On May 25, 2018, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that has been in the pipeline for a couple of years now goes into effect across European Union EU and European Economic Areas EEA. This has replaced the old privacy laws of 1995. It is a much tougher regime now, not least because companies must adhere to a new framework that creates consistent and reliable data protection rules across the EU and EEA. All businesses that process the personal data of individuals in the EU and EEA must comply with the GDPR or risk strict penalties and fines. The regulators will be able to impose hefty fines on organizations that misuse customers/citizens personal information.


Top 5 Alternatives to Heroku

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Heroku is a PaaS (Platform as a Service) and is one of the pioneers of the cloud service providers, before they came into the scene there was a huge challenge building and configuring servers from the scratch, not to talk of the drawback from shared hosting and the various complexities that comes with cloud hosting and deployment strategies. It brought a system that made app building, scaling and deployment so easy that it doesn’t take much time before they became a household name in the developer community.


What is function as a service?

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The general concept in the developer community is that serverless technology is basically all about Function as a service (FaaS). In fact, most developers think another name for serverless is FaaS — a process that allows developers deliver workloads without provisioning and managing facilities like servers and other infrastructures.


Firebase Alternatives – Top 10 Competitors

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It’s no secret that every developer wants to develop great apps, and if you’re one of them, we are here to help you discover some of the best alternatives to Firebase to help take your mobile app a notch higher.


Parse Server and Android : A perfect solution for your app Backend

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Do you own a business or have an awesome product to put on display? If yes, are you already on the web and the Play Store? In this era of digitization, with businesses going online and the number of mobile devices increasing exponentially, it’s imperative for every product and company to reach out to its customers’ mobile.


The secret of Parse and Facebook

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Over the last few years, open source has become the “default” way of building software. Currently, the world of open source is witnessing a plethora of innovations at a considerably high pace. Many of today’s business models are built around free, open source technology. As a result, enterprises are adequately providing support on various open source components and are increasingly shifting their workloads towards open data architecture.


Android App for Raspberry Pi

In our previous tutorials on IoT, we covered how to setup a Raspberry Pi and how to connect it to Parse Server using Back4App API to save objects to the server and to perform Queries and Live Queries.

Now we cover how to reproduce everything done on the Raspberry side to the App side. In this tutorial, we describe an Android App to interact with the IoT device configured earlier. From the Parse Server side, the App does the same tasks as the Raspberry: writes objects and performs Queries and Live Queries. Please note these functionalities may be useful even if you do not plan to develop an IoT application!


Serverless Architecture: AWS Lambda vs Parse Cloud Code

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Come on, let’s get ready to RUMBLE!

Introducing first, the challenger, fighting out of the blue corner: It came with its open source stack and huge open source community. Ladies and Gentlemen, please welcome ‘Parse Cloud Code’

And now introducing the Titleholder, fighting out of the red corner, it came with its bunch of resources and features. Presenting the reigning, defending Serverless champion of the world: ‘AWS Lambda’


Parse Server: The Best Practices Guide

Parse Server: The Best Practices Guide

Introduction 

This guide aims to provide a set of good practices that will be helpful to beginners as well as expert developers who are starting to work with Back4App. If you are an experienced user of the platform, we recommend you to at least take a quick look at this tutorial, as it will surely help you find something informative that you didn’t know before.


Parse Server example – Continuous Integration

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Introduction

Continuous Integration (CI) is the practice of merging all developer working copies to a shared repository several times a day. Its primary objective is to prevent integration problems, ensure quality and eliminate rework. It is meant to be used in combination with automated unit tests and continuous delivery so as, to reduce the breaking of code and to ensure that the software is always in a state that can be deployed to users, thus making the deployment process much quicker.

To enable all these features, it is necessary to use a CI server. For this tutorial, we will be using Travis CI , which is a hosted, distributed continuous integration service used to build and test software projects hosted on GitHub. Travis can be used to automate all sorts of tasks such as building, testing, and deploying software, with continuous integration and facilitation of technical aspects of continuous delivery.